The Doctors’ Meetings

Every other Friday, before each doctor sets out for the day’s appointments, the four of us meet at the only diner in town. Our practice sits on the edge of a quaint town with no need for a single stoplight or stop sign. One of only two restaurants, the diner is nestled in a row of buildings that look straight out of a stagecoach western. State patrol frequently choses this humble eatery as the location for their change-of-shift. On those particular mornings, the diner’s small gravel parking is overrun by patrol cars. This is also the only time when the town experiences traffic as a result of overly-cautious commuters going 10 below the 25 mph speed limit.

Our doctor meetings are held over breakfast, with discussion prompted by 2 or 3 items on the “doctors meeting list” or DML. Items that make it onto the DML come from a wide range of topics, vary in importance and certainly are not guaranteed to stimulate rivoting conversation. Over the past couple months, items on the DML have include updated pricing, barn packages, changes to inventory, on-call schedules, charging tax on products, assistant performance issues, standard protocols for packing equipment, damaged or missing equipment, new drugs we’d like to have on hand…etc.

Once the items on the DML have been checked off, there is an end to the meeting formalities. This is when the meetings get interesting. This is my favorite part of the doctors meetings, when I get to revel in the hard-earned wisdom of seasoned vets.

Case discussions.

It starts off with one of us seeking input on a particularly challenging case. Without fail, it leads to the opening of the case discussion floodgates. In discussing one case, someone inevitably remembers a case they would like insight on…which triggers another doctor to bring up their recent patients and so on.

I call it the case dominos effect.

These dominos turn half-hour meetings into 1.5 hour meetings, subsequently making us all late to our first appointments and causing a chaotic post-meeting scramble in the office. While fascinating and rich with info, there is another reason I look forward to these talks. Its the environment that has been created for the conversations. The table is a safe place to talk openly and without fear. There is no room for judgment, shaming or belittling. These moments are key to nurturing a honest, sincere comradery between colleagues and fosters a strong sense of moral and unity…things I have rarely seen in multi-doctor practices. In an effort to net suggestions or help from our combined 48 years of experience, we also create a robust support system and receive encouragement.

And there have rare occasions when our conversation divulges to less professionally astute topics in veterinary medicine, like the newest gossip about neighboring vets and practices. That’s a subject for another time, and a deserves it’s own blogpost.

And if the DML is blank? We still meet for breakfast because that’s just a pleasant way to start the day.

Published by MorganDVM

After graduating from vet school in 2015 and completing a year long equine internship, I entered private practice as an equine ambulatory veterinarian. Like most people in the veterinary field, I have respect and compassion towards all species, with a passion for horses. My work-life balance includes roadtripping, hiking, succulents, aquariums and is made complete by my wonderful pets.

6 thoughts on “The Doctors’ Meetings

  1. Interesting – I never thought about it but I can imagine a vet’s life could be isolating. This is a good thing to do. I don’t know where you are, but I’m sure you know how to cope with inclement weather, in your line of work. Still, I hope the latest craziness wasn’t too inconvenient for you. And thanks for the follow, I appreciate it.

    Like

  2. I just wrote in my leadership blog about something very similar how as leaders we have to seek help from our mentors! it is so easy to think that they are going to look at us like we are well dumb but having this ability to ask questions and gain valuable knowledge is huge!! I love that your practice does this!!

    Like

  3. The best part of the day! What a WONDERFUL post of the group you work with, and how cool to share all those years of wisdom and experience to enrich everyone’s practicing vet medicine! – Diana 😁

    Liked by 1 person

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