Reader opinions wanted!

First, I want to say thank you to all the wonderful readers who comment on my posts. I have received heartfelt, supportive, insightful, constructive and empathetic comments and messages…and on difficult days, these notes easily become the most encouraging and inspiring part of my day.

Thank you!

As much as I ramble, rant and randomly post about the various aspects of vet life…I am curious what readers would like to hear more about? So I created this little poll, just to gather some feedback and help take this blog in different directions.


Unsolved Mystery (Part 2)

Picking up where I left off, the last entry was about an emergency case involving a non-weight bearing lameness and unexpected penetrating wound to the abdomen. Without the financial option for referral, the owner (fictitiously referred to as Karen from here on out) opted for managing the mare (fictious name of Sugar) at home. Our aggressive antibiotic required placement of an intravenous catheter, and intense training session regarding care, maintenance, problem solving and how to use a catheter. I am always nervous when it comes to client managing catheters in the field. Luckily, Karen had previous experience working under a vet in an equine surgical center.

Sugar was started on a 5 day course of intravenous antibiotics (Kpen and gentamicin) and an anti-inflammatory (flunixin). The dime-size penetrating wound was sutured closed. I expeted that the would see evidence of complications (peritonitis, compromised bowel etc) within the first 24 hours, and was pleasantly surprised when Karen informed me Sugar was holding steady. Her appetite and energy level remained consistent, as did her severe lameness on the hind leg. It wasn’t until day 3 that she threw the first fever, a staggering 104.5 F. When the fever was unresponsive to banamine, Karen took to giving alcohol baths. I was anticipating at any moment, the downward spiral would begin…but aside from transient fevers, Sugar was still holding steady at day 5.

On day 5, Karen reported the catheter wouldn’t flush and after confirming it was no longer patent, we pulled it. To continue the antibiotic coverage, Karen was given excede and her fevers had stopped. Haunting still, was the none-weight-bearing lameness that remained unchanged, and was now making me suspect a pelvic or hip injury. With her budget depleted, no additional diagnostcs or treatments were an option…and we began discussing quality of life concerns for the severe lameness. Karen painfully drew a cut-off point for Sugar’s recovery, which was a week. If her hind leg wasn’t showing improvement by the end of the week, she would have to be let go.

I didn’t hear from Karen for a week, and when an appointment popped up on my scheduled, I assumed the worst. Much to my surprise, her lameness had improved by 50%. And after another week, she was 90% sound on the left hind. Sugar never looked back after that…she recovered completely, despite the odds.

Word on the Street

And the mystery of the penetrating injury? It’s all heresay, but on my final visit to see Sugar…a neighbor just happened to swing by.

“It’s been bothering me ever since day 1. I was working in the garden, a quarter mile down the street. And you seen those big concrete pillars? Well, that day I was pulling weeds, and saw this man park his car right next to the pillars. He got out with a big black duffel bag and I remember wondering now what is he doing. At first I thought he was just working on something for the county. But he was in normal clothes, a white t-shirt and jeans. I just kept doing my gardening and it must’ve been an hour. When I looked over, he was laying on his stomach on the top of the pillar, like they always show snipers doing. And I heard my phone ring, so I went to answer it and in the middle of my phone call, there was a gunshot. My husband and I hunt, I know a gun shot when I heard one. I thought he’s poaching! I looked out to see he was still there on his stomach. So I called the police because you can’t be firing into someone’s pasture or at farm land like that. Well, I was terrified and stayed inside…I didn’t want him to know I was in there. When I heard the police knocking and answered the door, I could see over their shoulders that other cops were walking around the pillar but the guy’s car was gone. I think that guy shot the horse!”

Seeing the Signs

This story stuck with me, because a month later, at a farm in the area there had been a couple cows believed to have been shot (they didn’t die, but had wounds similar to Sugar’s. When a dog and goat were shot a months later in the neighboring town, what originally sounded like a far fetched theory…started resonate.

It’s been a couple months now, and I have yet to hear of more animal shootings…but if this really is a person targeting animals, could the target become a human? Unfortunately, the city and state police don’t consider the events related…but it also sounds like there has been little follow-up into what could be considered early indications that we have a fledging psychopath.

the Unexpected Problem #2 (ER case, part 1)

After seeing a couple of routine appointments, we started receiving back-to-back emergencies. Our emergency calls included a colic, a foot abscess, a case of cellulitis and a minor laceration. Around 9pm, right as we parked the work truck in the garage, my work phone rang. On the other end of the line, was a panick stricken owner who thought her horse had fractured its leg after getting kicked by another horse in turn-out. We regrouped, and made the short 25 minute drive to the ER.


The Presenting Complaint and (Most) Obvious Problem

When we arrived, we spotted the mare in the beam of our headlamps. She stood in the pasture, trembling, painful and unable to bear weight on her hind leg. Aside from a <1 inch long laceration through the skin located in front of her hip, there were no real significant findings on my physical exam. I could not palpate a fragment, fracture or instability in the limb. After ruling out a foot abscess, fracture of the distal phalanx, we confirmed no fracture from the stifle down. Our radiograph equipment in the field is not capable of shooting images of the hips or pelvis, and with no ultrasound, ruling out a pelvic fracture wasn’t going to be an option. Leaving her in the pasture, without water or shelter, was not an acceptable option. After giving pain meds and sedation, we inched our way slowly and steadily to the barn.

Discovering the (Less) Obvious, but Equally Serious Problem

In the barn, I turned my attention to the wound over the hip while I next steps for the painful leg. After clipping around the wound, I was both shocked and disturbed to find out the extent of the wound. What looked like a superficial, small tear in the skin, was actually a dime-sized penetrating wound. With a flashlight, I looked into the wound and probed the extent. Beyond layers of muscle, fascia, fat and connective tissue…I found myself looking through a tiny viewing window right into the mare’s abdomen. I saw the glisten of light off what I presumed to be the right dorsal colon.

Bad Gets Worse

A penetrating wound into the abdomen doesn’t carry a favorable prognosis, especially when managed in the field. The client’s financial constraints meant referral for hospitalization was not an option. Abdominocentesis (belly tap), bloodwork, ultrasound, SAA…also not within the financial realm. Dedicated to trying, and wanting to give the mare a chance, the client asked for the most aggressive approach we could take to treating in the field within set limitations.

Antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, suturing the wound and monitoring comprised the mainstay of our treatment protocol. To be honest, I was expecting these efforts to serve mainly as a comfort and reassurance that we had tried something. I’ve seen horses succumb to far less serious ailments with intensive treatments and hospitalization. We placed an IV catheter so we could start a robust course of antibiotics (kpen and gentamicin) and banamine.

Where it gets interesting

By 1am, we had discussed catheter care, administer meds, given extensive instructions on what to watch for…and when we left, the entire ride back was filled discussions on everyone’s thoughts, ideas, speculations …wondering about the source of the lameness as well as the surprising penetrating hole. The hole was clean through the side of the horse, with defined edges and minimal surrounding trauma…almost like it had been made intentionally, by someone blessed with the art of careful dissection. Without knowing the systemic status of the horse, I could hardly sleep with thoughts of the undiagnosed fracture, the possibility of punctured bowel, the chance that whatever punctured her side could be floating around in the abdomen, the imminent danger of sepsis and endotoxemia…this, combined with group speculation as to what caused the wound.

A stick?

A nail?

Fencing?

Tree branch?

What about a bullet? The client asked, explaining that the family dog had sustained a similar injury a year ago when he had been shot with a small-caliber gun (pellet gun or 22?) by a disgruntled neighbor. With so many unknowns, possible complications and serious risks associated with this emergency case… I was not optimistic about the outcome of our next visit, which I expected would in the very, very near future.