Facing the Repercussions

To really understand this post in context, you’ll need to understand the backstory. If you haven’t already read the predecessor to this entry, I highly recommend it.

In order to make an employee’s last two weeks a “living hell,” Dr. Cray gave the office staff and myself her decree to engage in work-place warfare. My last post left off at a pivotal moment. I accepted the reality of the work-place situation and the brutal truth about my boss’s nature. Then, I did the thing I should have done months ago. I spoke up. I refuse to make someone’s life a living hell. And from that point on, the work-place is becoming my living a hell.


My Redefined Role and Responsibilities

Everything but a Veterinarian

Unable to hire new employees, the office was severely understaffed. Now, instead of seeing appointments in the afternoons, I was assigned to the front desk as a receptionist. This is when I began to struggle, both personally and professionally. And the troubles didn’t stay at work. With only two other employees, Dr. Cray’s started singling me out. She became uncharacteristically kind to the other two office personell, bringing them gifts each morning and asking about their weekend. When she turned to face me, she snap at me to go clean her instrument tray from the ER last night or go count the vaccines in her truck. Everything became a test or barrage of rapid-firing questions (to which some of the questions were about patients I never saw, prescriptions I was never involved in, or billing accounts that were from 5 years ago). She seemed content if I did not know an answer, and became vicious when I did. She took to devaluing me in front of clients and other employees.

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Within a couple weeks, she allowed me to see appointments only 1 day a week. When clients requested appointments with me, she told the office to tell them I wasn’t available…little by little, I watched the only benefit to my job dissipate. Veterinary experience, the only thing worth staying for, was slowly replaced by my new duties which included:

  • Restocking supplies, tracking orders,
  • Create and maintain inventory system
  • Truck inventory, maintenance
  • Manage all social media accounts
  • IT for all office equipment (phones, computer, scanners, fax, internet)
  • Invoicing
  • Equipment maintenance
  • Barn tasks (feeding, stall cleaning, turn-out)
  • Yard upkeep

Veterinarian turned Receptionist turned Detective

All those hours I put in at the front desk paid off. In an attempt to fully analyze the situation, and come up with a plan…I started gathering intel. When the UPS guy saw me up front, he said he wouldn’t bother learning anyone’s name because no one sticks around long enough for it to be worthwhile. Thanks to the UPS guy, I started looking for more information about the previous associates. I remembered she didn’t order me business cards for the first 2 months in case I was going to quit. She said she’d spent too much money on wasted cards. After looking into the business card order history, what I found was startling.

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Over the past 10 years, 9 associates were hired, and of the nine associates not a single one worked for Dr. Cray longer than a month. No surprise there! I also had mixed emotions about what this said about me. Obviously someone with a healthy amount of self respect would not put up with or stay in this type of environment. I don’t like to quit, and I will endure, endure, endure. Although I gave myself credit for getting through the last four months, I also had to change my way of thinking. I’m not here to endure. My goal and aspirations are not to endure life, endure each day. What is the sense in being in the profession I love, if every day I dread and resent going to work? I suffer, my relationships suffer, and it doesn’t do the profession any good.


If someone doesn’t know whats wrong, how can they fix it? I’m a believer in that concept, and I had been silent for too long. If we were going to make this work, we were going to have to make some changes. It was time to sit down and have a chat with Dr. Cray. I worked the meeting into our schedules, and gave her a heads up that there were some items I wanted to discuss with her.

And in 2 days, that’s exactly what we’ll do.

#veterinarian #vet #vetmed #vetlife #equine #horse #equinevet #ambulatory #mobilevet #veterinarypractice #dayinthelife #doctor #profession #equineveterinarian

A whole ‘nother species

Even though I was hired on as a predominantly equine vet, and have concentrated my efforts, time, professional endeavors and life to equine medicine, I accrued a decent amount of experience with small ruminants both before and throughout vet school. I’d like to place the emphasis on the descriptor ‘small’ ruminants. I’ll ride along with my boss on any call, no matter the species. There is one species (well, excluding camelids and pigs) that I absolutely don’t feel confident in. Cows.

On my treasured Saturday off after a rough week of colics and lacerations, I knew something was up when my boss rang. She sounded optimistic, “Whatcha doin’?” I was honest, and she knew my sleeping habits by then. On any Saturday I have off, at 9 am you can bet I’m sleeping. She informed me she had three emergencies that had simultaneously called and were all in different directions. She was nearly to one, and the next one was a horse with a laceration of unknown proportion. She didn’t have to ask because I knew why she was calling. “What ER would you like me to take?”1500039069095-542038303

Three words over the phone and I was wide awake.

Sick.

Down.

Calf.

The other calf they recently acquired had died in the night, and my boss suspected this farm call was more in the direction of euthanasia than heroics. I headed out with the address plugged into the GPS and an ETA of 30 minutes. Highways to streets to gravel road and the numbering on possible driveways became scarce. Luckily, I had discovered the Google Maps’ satellite view and this helped tremendously with locating barns and houses. But, satellite imaging via Google Maps was nothing without mobile data. This ran out with about 4 miles to go and I ended up taking a long gravel road that zigzagged past caved in barns, abandoned double-wides and the occasional deserted house. The road ended at a picnic shelter camped out in front of a lake…I hadn’t passed anything matching the physical address of the house I was looking for.

Out across the open pasture, I spotted an old, tiny run-down cabin. (I might have overlooked it as a storage shed, but after a couple months of farm calls in this area, I never underestimate what structures serve as someone’s home). I heard the lawn mower first, then spotted the red riding lawn mower as it rounded the shack. It’s rider was a shirtless man in his 60s or 70s, with tattered suspender straps over his shoulders and a wide brimmed straw hat. He sported a cigarette from one corner of his mouth, and a long piece of straw out the other. His jack Russell sounded the alarm. I waved as he slowly made his way over to the truck. Over the barking dog, I asked if he happened to have a sick calf. He left the lawn mower idling as I got out of the truck. He gave me a once over look and shook his head. He looked disinterested and slightly annoyed and motioned over his shoulders “My neighbors have a calf.” Then he gave directions that sounded as helpful as google map’s “no network” message.

I started to get into he truck when he hollered. “Are you the animal doc?” And I answered yes.

After I answered yes, he gave a mischievous grin and winked. “If you’re the doc, I’m an animal. You want to work on me?”

I shook my head and put some effort into a laugh, one of those ha-ha very funny laughs. Then I got in the truck and performed a 7 or 8 point turn as the self-proclaimed animal on the riding lawnmower made cat calls.

The truck’s diesel engine is loud, but wasn’t loud enough to drown out the series of howls he let out from under his wide-brim hat.

#veterianrian #vet #vetmed #vetlife #equine #horse #equinevet #ambulatory #mobilevet #veterinarypractice #dayinthelife #doctor #profession